That Peaceful Easy Feeling

To celebrate my birthday, one of my requests was a day at the spa. Not just any spa but this Zen-style spa out in the woods about an hour and a half from where I live. It’s pricey but it’s an experience. And that’s what I’m after — experiences — not more stuff. I’ve got enough stuff.

 The day began with a lovely drive on the back roads of Sonoma County. It was unintentional but the GPS fed us this circuitous yet gorgeous route. I saw parts of Sonoma I’ve never seen — so green and lush — it’s amazing how just a drive through more nature, less concrete, can ease your tension.

The massage treatment I signed up for focused on the body’s meridians and included essential oils. Surprisingly, the 75-minute treatment has you wearing loose clothing; it reminded me of a Thai massage I once had. Although I usually dislike lying on my stomach, I went for it in spite of the nearly constant sinus drainage I experience. The therapist moved my limbs in different ways than an ordinary massage would necessitate.

I didn’t fall asleep but I was very relaxed. It’s often disconcerting that you have to get up so soon after a massage but I felt a little less pressure here. I wasn’t forced to face the world too soon. What awaited me after the massage was a beautiful meditation garden which you enter through a gate that requests silence.

In the last couple of years I have a new respect for silence. I crave it. Is this part of growing older? Or perhaps it’s a result of having a neurological condition where I often find my senses overwhelmed by bright light and a cacophony of noise?

Seated under a pagoda sipping warm tea, I just watched and listened (and naturally shot a little video). My body was relaxed, my mind was relaxed. I was in the moment.

Can I capture this moment again and again? I want this moment to last longer. I want this moment to repeat, and repeat, and repeat.


The Healing Power of Touch

Acupressure, Swedish, Shiatsu, Reflexology, Cranial-Sacral, Rolfing, Sports — these are all different massage modalities. Carl Johns, massage therapist and instructor at McKinnon Institute, practices what he calls Acucraniatsu.

In this podcast episode Carl answers my questions about medical massage, reflexology, and working with clients who have a chronic health condition.

A couple of books Carl mentions are: Job’s Body by Deane Juhan and Touching: The Human Significance of the Skin by Ashley Montagu.