Food=Medicine: Cooking with Love

In the continuing series, Food=Medicine, Cooking with Love explores different interpretations of how love can be a vital element in the food we eat. Whether it’s part of the mission of a local organic farm, a vegetarian chef preparing pureed, nutrient-dense food for her father with progressive Parkinson’s disease, or another chef infusing fine dining, multi-coursed meals with cannabis — each guest offers a fresh perspective for mindful eating.

Lacey Sher, owner/Chef of the Encuentro pop-up restaurant in Oakland, CA shares two recipes for nutrient-dense smoothies. Aleta Pierce, farm manager for Alameda Point Collaborative’s farm2market program, welcomes farm volunteers and CSA subscribers. Michael Magallanes, San Francisco-based chef, prepares meals for private clients.

Sweet and Green Protein Smoothie

hemp milk, coconut water, or spring water

handful organic fresh or frozen blueberries

handful organic fresh or frozen raspberries

4-5 leaves of lacinato kale or romaine

handful of parsley

2 scoops hemp protein

3 pitted dates

1/2 avocado

– add ingredients into your Vitamix or blender
– blend together until super smooth
– pour into your favorite to go jar or mug
– sip slow and enjoy!

Berry Banana Antioxidant Booster   

This smoothie is full of colorful foods, such as berries and cacao, which are loaded with a wealth of vitamins and antioxidants to help the body stay strong and vital. Plus with B-vitamin dense maca, omega rich hemp seeds, and beauty boosting coconut oil, this smoothie is filling yet completely whole and natural, assuring optimal function of body and mind. Enjoy!

3 cups of water or herbal tea

1 cup frozen organic blueberries

1 cup frozen organic strawberries or raspberries

1 frozen or fresh organic banana

handful of cacao nibs

2 tablespoons raw coconut oil

1/3 cup hemp seeds

2 tablespoons maca

1/2 stick vanilla bean or ½ teaspoon vanilla extract

optional: 2 tablespoons spirulina, your favorite green powder, or vanilla

Sweetener of choice: 3 tablespoons honey or agave, 2-3 pitted dates, or 3 drops stevia (Stevia is very sweet and strong. Use the least amount to taste.)
– add ingredients into your Vitamix or blender
– blend together until super smooth
– pour into your favorite to go jar or mug
– sip slow and enjoy!

These are simple and delicious and folks can use less fruit for less sweetness. I also like to add different ingredients such as chia, moringa powder, sometimes different vegetables like cooked or raw sweet potatoes, substitute spinach for kale if I have it. So many options. ~ Lacey Sher

Resources for Dysphagia (Swallowing difficulties)

If you truly want to understand the mechanics of dysphagia, check out this recorded webinar with the author of the textbook, Dysphagia: Clinical Management in Adults and Children, Michael E. Groher, Ph.D. It’s about an hour in duration but you’ll have a much better understanding of what this condition is.

Here is a community-generated recipe guide for people with swallowing difficulties. Recipes were submitted by caregiving family members.

Here is a recorded panel discussion about food preparation for people with dysphagia. Additional resources can be found here.

More Food=Medicine Podcast Episodes

The first Food=Medicine podcast episode included Retired Navy Lieutenant Laura Root and Edibell Stone, LPC & health coach talking about their respective diets. The second Food=Medicine podcast episode featured Jill Nussinow, The Veggie Queen, at the Farm to Fermentation Festival. Jill is a Registered Dietician and author of cookbooks and DVDs. If you want to go deeper into an understanding of fermented foods and their healing properties, check out this episode with fermentation guru, Sandor Katz. This episode explores the ancient tradition of Ayurveda through one woman’s health and diet journey.


Self-Care Challenge Month 2: Diet & Nutrition

Last month I embarked on a Self-Care Challenge and invited you to join me. You can join at any time by reading the posts, contributing feedback in our Glass Half Full Facebook group, and using the Health Storylines online tool.

I’ve been practicing Self Care for years without even realizing it. Years ago, before I was diagnosed with a neuromuscular disease, I began to experiment with my diet. I didn’t necessarily have a bad diet but I often felt bloated, experienced abdominal cramps, and probably had what we now know to be irritable bowel syndrome.

I can’t recall what the impetus was but it happened over 30 years ago. I gave up eating beef. Within a year or two I was no longer eating any animal flesh and called myself a lacto-ovo vegetarian (plant-based diet with dairy/eggs). My bloating disappeared. My cramps were intermittent but I still had that occasional nervous stomach.

A diet is really a dynamic concept. It shouldn’t be fixed, i.e. eating the same foods every day. The seasons change and there are different foods to be consumed aligned with the season. Our bodies change. We continue to learn more about food, how food is prepared, nutrients and micronutrients. As I’ve learned more about food and nutrition over the years, I continue to tweak my diet.

Little changes can have a huge impact. When I started going for acupuncture treatments, 15 or so years ago, I was asked about my diet by the practitioner. No Western-trained physician had ever spent much time talking with me about my diet. Even when I complained of GI problems. I won’t even attempt to claim any real knowledge of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) but there is a long history of food = medicine. The first change I made during my course of TCM treatments was giving up that big glass of orange juice I started each day with. That cold sugar hit was not welcomed by my belly.

I’ve learned so much about food over the years and if I shared it, this would become the longest blog post in history. But, that’s not what I want to do. My diet & nutrition journey is likely different from yours. Becoming a vegetarian has helped me, yet it’s not the only way to eat a well-balanced diet. There are plenty of vegetarians that eat poorly and plenty of omnivores that eat well.

In the next month I will post in the Facebook group…mostly factoids from various nutrition newsletters I read. Here’s the Self-Care Challenge for YOU:

  • Become aware of what you’re eating, how much of it, and how often. The best way to do this is with a Food Diary. Using the online Health Storylines tool, you can keep track of your daily intake using the Food Diary feature.
  • Knowing what you already know about good foods and beverages & bad foods and beverages, each week select one bad food to omit for a week. And try to eat a new food — something plant-based. I’ll help you with suggestions.

Remember, small steps in making health behavior changes are the key. Good luck!


Every Breath You Take: Tips for Respiratory Health

It’s cold and flu season so I asked a respiratory therapist I know — Lee Guion — to offer some guidance. Here are Lee’s 7 Tips for Respiratory Health which are critical for those with a condition that causes weakened muscles:

  1. Attend a Multi-Disciplinary Clinic
  2. Get the flu and pneumonia vaccines
  3. Treat upper respiratory tract infections
  4. Hydrate
  5. Maximize your nutrition
  6. Exercise — especially disciplines coordinating the breath with movement
  7. Sleep Well

 

But this list is only a list. You should listen to the podcast.

There are many online videos to guide you in a practice combining breath work and movement but here’s one from the Niroga Institute for people with asthma.

Here are Homework Assignments for the rest of 2017:

  • Listen to previous podcast episodes about everything from medical cannabis to mindfulness meditation as well as fermentation.
  • Soon there will be cool videos here.
  • Check out this documentary film, Unrest. It’s a “story of love and loss” about people diagnosed with myalgic encephalomyelitis (commonly known as chronic fatigue syndrome).

 

 


Ayurveda: Moderation is the Key

Shaaranya Geetanjali Chakraborty’s health journey includes many stops along the way before finding Ayurveda. Not only did the ancient tradition of medicine cure her of chronic constipation and eczema but it changed the course of her career. Shaaranya is a graduate of Vedika Global founded by Acharya Shunya, scholar of the Vedic Sciences of Ayurveda, Yoga, and Vedanta. You can learn more about Shaaranya’s work here.

For more information about Ayurveda, check out Acharya’s book, Ayurveda Lifestyle Wisdom: A Complete Prescription to Optimize Your Health, Prevent Disease, and Live with Vitality and Joy.

 


AIDS, activism, gut health, micro-organisms & role models: A conversation with Sandor Katz

Sandor Katz has been living with AIDS for over 20 years. In this episode he talks about his early activism, getting back to nature, and his passion for fermented foods.

You can learn more about the wonderful world of micro-organisms through Sandor’s books — Wild Fermentation and The Art of Fermentation — as well as his website with links to his YouTube videos.


Food = Medicine (2): The Veggie Queen

This is a continuation of the last podcast episode exploring how food can be the best medicine. In this episode I spoke with Jill Nussinow, The Veggie Queen, at the Farm to Fermentation Festival. Jill is a Registered Dietician and author of cookbooks and DVDs. Her most recent book is Vegan Under Pressure: Perfect Vegan Meals Made Quick and Easy in Your Pressure Cooker.

This podcast is for anyone interested in adding more plant-based dishes to their diet or is curious about fermented foods.

 


Food = Medicine (1)

This is the first of perhaps several episodes to explore how food = medicine for a variety of people with different chronic health conditions. In this episode I speak with Retired Navy Lieutenant Laura Root and Edibell Stone, LPC & health coach about their respective diets.

Edibell strongly recommends a book that’s inspired her — The Urban Monk: Eastern Wisdom and Modern Hacks to Stop Time and Find Success, Happiness, and Peace — and finds great plant-based recipes on this website.


Brain Health

One of the great advantages to being a consultant and having time flexibility is the chance to attend daytime events. A couple of weeks ago I attended the Brain Health Symposium at San Francisco’s Commonwealth Club. Seven highly-qualified and fascinating guest speakers each presented about an area related to brain health. I’ll provide some of the highlights but I encourage you to visit the Commonwealth website to listen to a podcast if anything piques your interest.

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