The Heat is On! How Weather Affects Our Health

Hot weather affects the health of humans and animals

Basset Hound with ears flapping in front of a fan

High temperatures can exacerbate symptoms for someone with a chronic health condition. The best way to cope may be to seek refuge in an air-conditioned environment. If that proves to be difficult, you may learn about a few tools and resources from patient advocates, You’ll meet Kate Mitchell, from Boston, who has Rheumatoid Arthritis and POTS (Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome), Danny van Leeuwen, also in Boston, who has Multiple Sclerosis, and Brook McCall, in Portland, Oregon, who has a spinal cord injury. They share their experiences with weather — hot, cold, ice, snow, and pressure changes.

7 Hot Tips to Beat the Heat

1. Pre-cooling

Check out the National Multiple Sclerosis Society website for information about pre-cooling techniques.

2. Hydration

Water’s great but so are some other beverages. The Ayurvedic tradition focuses on herbs, spices, and other plant-based remedies to cool you down. Check this magazine article for a few recipes. If you’re intrigued by Ayurveda, have you listened to last year’s podcast episode?

3. Diet Modification

Consider eating smaller, lighter meals. Here’s a list of hydrating foods.

4. Clothing

Check out this issue of the UC-Berkeley Wellness Newsletter for tips on appropriate clothing for hot weather.

5. AC over Fans

This is discussed in the link above.

6. Yoga Poses

Curl your tongue and breathe. To learn more about this cooling yoga pranayama and other cooling asanas, visit this webpage.

7. Mediation

Listen to this guided meditation to help you cool down…once you’re safe inside or in a shaded area.

 


Essential Nutrient for Emotional, Physical & Spiritual Health: Vitamin N (Nature)

What is Nature and how is it beneficial to our emotional, physical, and spiritual well-being? Bonnie Lewkowicz (Program Manager, Access Northern California) and Lori Gray (Adventures & Outings Program Coordinator) both work for the Bay Area Outreach & Recreation Program (BORP) organization in Berkeley, California.

Bonnie, Lori, and Delroy share their love of nature in this podcast episode.

Both women use wheelchairs and have years of experience navigating hiking trails and organizing outdoor adventures for people with physical and/or developmental disabilities. Joining them is middle school teacher, Delroy Thompson, in South Florida. Together they share how important nature is for them.

Bonnie wrote A Wheelchair Rider’s Guide published by the Coastal Conservancy. Delroy, is a member of the Muscular Dystrophy Association National Community Advisory Committee, and wrote a children’s book, The Secret of the Elves in Helen, about an elf kingdom n the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Not everyone is fortunate enough to attend BORP events but you can search for similar organizations in your area at the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD) website.

Everybody who is in a body can DANCE and move – it’s a right we all have

Co-Founder of AXIS Dance Company

International Dance Day is April 29th. Here in Northern California we have Bay Area Dance Week with all types of free dance classes and performances. As Judith Smith, co-founder of the physically integrated dance company, AXIS, says, “Everybody who is in a body can dance and move — it’s a right we all have.” And that is the message of this podcast episode.

Years ago when I held my first dance marathon to raise money for the Muscular Dystrophy Association a banner hung with the slogan, “Dance for those who can’t”

Fundraising event for MDA held in a mall in North Miami Beach, Florida ~ 1978

and that sentiment couldn’t be further from the truth. The AXIS Dance Company has included artists with physical disabilities, commissioned award-winning choreographers and composers, toured 100+ cities, and appeared on Fox TV’s So You Think You Can Dance. Opportunities for adaptive dance exist from here — BORP’s World Dance for All — to North Carolina where Mindy Kim teaches chair dancing.

Leia Cash, a lifelong dancer and educator, teaches adaptive dance classes at the Ed Roberts Campus in Berkeley, adults with Parkinson’s disease, and seniors at a residential facility.

 


Resilience & Aging with a Disability

Research findings from the Aging and the Quality of Life survey — conducted at University of Washington’s Rehabilitation Research & Training Center — report higher quality of life associated with a disabled person’s higher level of self-reported resilience.

After listening to this episode, check out this Fact Sheet for more information about building your resilience. Additional resources for building resilience can be found at the Greater Good Science Center and the book, Bouncing Back: Rewiring Your Brain for Maximum Resilience and Well-Being by Linda Graham.

If you’ve participated in research or clinical studies for your chronic health condition, please message me at our Facebook page.